Jumper's Knee vs  Runner's Knee

Jumper’s knee (patellar tendonitis) happens when the tendon connecting your shinbone to your kneecap becomes inflamed.  Runner’s knee (patellofemoral pain syndrome) occurs when your kneecap has veered off the patellar groove. Jumper’s knee is almost always caused by repetitive impact and runner’s knee results from overuse or direct trauma.

What's the Difference?

Both of these injuries are prevalent among athletes and can be worsened by weak muscles. Runner’s knee can often manifest in young adults, and can occur in active or inactive people who ramp up their activity too quickly and cause pressure inside the knee joint. Older and overweight adults are more likely to get jumper’s knee. Athletes who overtrain or avoid warmups are also more likely to injure their tendons.

Who is at Risk?

Jumper's Knee: Symptoms and Signs

1

Sharp pain just below kneecap

2

Swollen knee

3

Pain when bending or straightening the leg

4

Pain when putting weight on leg

Runner's Knee: Symptoms and Signs

1

Dull pain in the front of the knee

2

Grinding or grating sensation when bending the knee

3

Worsening knee pain when kneeling, squatting, or climbing stairs

Treatment Options

1

RICE: Rest, ice, compression and elevation

2

Stretching and strengthening exercises

3

Improving warmup or training activities

4

Physical therapy

No matter what symptoms you’re experiencing, getting prompt medical attention is one of the best ways to keep your knees in good shape.  The good news is that both conditions tend to respond well to conservative treatment options.

The Right Treatment for Jumper's & Runner's Knee

You depend on your knees a lot - probably more than you realize. Delaying treatment could aggravate your symptoms and develop more serious problems in the future. To learn more, contact Orthoillinois and request an appointment with Dr. Van Thiel today.